Creating Capitalism

Creating Capitalism

Creating Capitalism

The question well put is: Are you creating capitalism? Are you part of the problem or are you one with the solution of building the economy?

These questions may seem strange, but are actually quite logical. If you live in an urban area and seek to work nearby, then you may be working against the principles of growth. While everyone wants to be where the jobs are and live near one’s work, this is not always in line with prosperity. A massive amount of people competing for a small amount of jobs is a situation of high competition, but it is not necessarily conducive to growth.

Employers welcome multiple applications and enjoying reviewing many applications for the same position. These employers should perhaps set up shop in rural areas and advertise similar vacancies, in an effort to truly diverse their hiring pool and to demonstrate a concerted effort to enrich the economy. Workers go where the jobs are located. If the best jobs are in rural areas, then this is where people will begin moving to be close to their jobs. Hence, the economy will grow and areas formerly in state of economic stagnation will begin to develop and bolster the regional and national economy.

As an employer you may have doubts about the value of opening a location that is far from the main hub of customers and suppliers, but as more companies expand their operations, suppliers and customers will follow. Is your company part of the problem or solution?

Housing prices are lower in urban areas for similar house sizes with equal features, so there is no doubt that workers will want to move there. If it costs less to live near one’s work, then one will be less likely to expect or regularly require a raise or promotion.

Many businesses and organizations seem to be oblivious to the obvious fact that by being located in a highly dense urban area the expected standard of living will be rich and the cost to maintain it will be high. This means employers will be asked to support the lifestyle of employees through wealthy salaries and optimal bonuses.

Instead of employer’s offering an opportunity to equally qualified workers who live outside of big cities, they continue to keep their operation positioned in the heart of major cities. A cycle of constant turnover and continuous salary and promotion renegotiation ensues, which never seems to end. What fuels this phenomenon?

 

 

 

 

 

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Compare